MENTAL HEALTH STUDY: SHOWS THE IMPORTANCE OF A MENTOR/COACH IN YOUNG PEOPLES LIVES TODAY

    Mental Health Study: 21% of third-level students have self-harmed.

     

    Almost half of college students have thought life was not worth living but most who are having serious problems do not seed help, research on young people’s mental health shows.

     

    Of 8000 third level students aged 10-25:

    .        43% have at some point thought their life was not worth living;

    .        21% reported deliberately hurting themselves, without wanting to take their own life.

    .        7% have tried to take their own life.

     

    But the study by the School of Pyschology at University College Dublin for Headstone – the young people’s mental health organization – found major knock-on effects of bullying that happened before students even started college.  Those who have been bullied were twice as likely as others to self-harm or attempt suicide, but lead researcher Dr Barbara Dooley said this relates to bullying at any stage of their lives.

     

    “For only 9% of those who were bullied, it had been in the last year.  It shows how bullying at any point can have long-term effects on mental health of young people,” said Dr Dooley.

    “The results show clearly that when young people talk about their problems, they have lower risks of mental health distress and are more positive in their outlook”, Dr Fitzgerald said.  “If young people have one good adult they can talk to – it could be a parent, a teacher, or a coach – they have much lower risk factors around mental health and higher levels of optimism, life satisfaction and self-esteem”, she said.

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